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Different Database Schemas and Their Use cases

A database schema is a grouping of database components, such as tables, views, indexes, and procedures, that create a logical container. There are multiple sorts of database schemas that are utilised in various scenarios, each with its own set of benefits and drawbacks. Some examples of common database schemas are:


Simple/single schema: The most basic sort of schema is a single schema, which is used in simple databases with only a few tables and relationships. A tiny retail store that merely needs to track sales and inventory is an example of a use case.


A star schema : is a sort of schema that is frequently used in data warehousing and business intelligence applications. A central fact table is linked to one or more dimension tables in a star schema. A retail store that has to track sales, inventory, and customer information is one example of a use case.


A snowflake schema : is a variant of the star schema that normalises dimension tables to eliminate redundancy. An example use case would be a retail store that needs to maintain sales, inventory, and customer information, as well as the information of their goods suppliers.


Schema of Third Normal Form (3NF): A 3NF schema is a form of schema that ensures data is stored in a way that eliminates redundancy and data inconsistency. A retail store, for example, would need to manage sales, inventory, and customer information while also ensuring that the data is consistent and reliable.


Data Vault schemas are a sort of schema that is used to model a Data Warehouse. It is based on the concept of building a historical archive of raw data, and it is frequently used for auditing and tracking changes through time. A retail store, for example, might need to track sales, inventory, and client information over time, as well as track changes to this information, such as when the price of a product changes.


Object-Oriented Schema: An object-oriented schema is one that is based on the object-oriented programming paradigm. It represents entities and their relationships using classes and objects. A retail store, for example, could want to represent products, customers, and orders as objects and utilise inheritance and polymorphism to express their interactions.


Graph schema: A graph schema is a sort of schema used to model data with several relationships. It represents entities and their relationships using nodes and edges. A social networking programme that needs to track users, their friends, and their posts is an example of a use case.


A multi-dimensional schema is a sort of schema that is used to model data for OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) systems. It represents data using a cube structure and enables for quick searching over several dimensions. A retail store, for example, could want to evaluate sales data by several dimensions such as time, location, and product type.


To summarise, the choice of schema is determined by the application's and data's individual requirements. Some schemas work best with simple, structured data, while others work best with complicated, unstructured data. Some schemas are designed to be fast for querying and reporting, while others are designed to ensure data integrity and consistency. When developing a database, understanding the characteristics of different schemas and how they are best used will help you make an informed decision.


Hope this Helps . Happy Learning.

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